Paul's STUDIO BUILD DIARY

Post and discuss acoustic topics, Studio design, construction, and soundproofing here

Postby Paul Woodlock » Fri Apr 09, 2004 1:50 am

Thurs 9th April 2004 00:32am

THE CONCRETE POUR!!!!!!


Greetings!

ALL DONE!!!!

:) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :) :)

However, I am completely tired and shagged out after a long squawk, erm, concrete pour.!!!

I'm struggling to type, but never mind I shall plod on.....

After breakfast I confirmed the delivery with the concrete company. And waited.

Mr Burns ( NIck Baddely ) turned up at around 2:30. However the concrete didn't turn up until 4pm. So a few cups of coffee were made.

It was a shame that the concrete pour and my mate Jonathan couldn't coincide. I would have loved to have Jon on the job ( Ooer! - I'll leave that to his Woman, Ruth ;) )

Hopefully he can make the next pour. I have huge respect for both Jon himself, and his construction knowledge and capabilities. Great Guy. He's a carpenter by trade, and when I once asked him what tolerence he worked to, he replied .."SPOT ON!" :) And it is.

Nicks a great guy too, and is also very handy. No worries there at all. ( As long as I didn't call him ' Judge' )

Finally the concrete truck arrived, and we could hardly understand a word the driver said. He was english, but his dialect was STRONG, and he spoke at 300bpm!!

I had to write on the ticket "I am responsible for any damge to the driveway" and sign it before he would back the concrete truck up. The driveway was fine, and held 26 tons of concrete and truck OK.

I grabbed the camera and got a shot of the first flow of concrete, and then got the rake and shovel out. About 1/2 cubic metre had been poured when we dicided this mix was gonna pour very easily. So the driver let the lot out in go. Amazing, it totally flooded the place in less than a minute. A cool sight really.

I say 'flooded the place' in a positive sense, as within no time the cnocrete had flowed around the whole mould and was doing a very good job at self levelling. WOW! This saved us a LOT of shovelling.

So while we waited for the extra 1/2 cubic metre, Nick and I proceeded to rake the 6 m3 already poured to a reasonable level a bit higher than the mould sides.

The concrete had poured so fast and quick it pushed up the Conrete expansion board around the perimiter above the level it should be. I had to go around bash it back down with a bit of wood and lump hammer and all was well..

Sadly the extra 1/2 m3 took another 40 minutes :( , although I wasn't too concerned about running out of time, as the stuff was still pretty wet. At least the 2nd truck driver was intelligable this time :) Woman arrived home from work as the 2nd load came. And proceeded to take some pictures

There was more concrete than required in the mould now. That's OK. Better too much than too little. We roguhly levelled it with rakes, and had a 5minute break, as we were both a bit knackerd by then. Walking around in the concrete isn't easy. Definitely a quicksand type experience.

We formulated a cunning plan. We'd walk towards the back wall with the 5m long woodend tamping beam, and compact and d a 1st screeding as we go. Any excess was chucked in a wheelbarrow and poured into the pagoda foundations. WE got this 1st pass done by about 6 oclock. The concrete had been here two hours by now, but it was still very wet ( thankfully ).

We then reversed and started teh final screed and smoothing. We screeded about 300mm worth and I went along with a hand float and smoothed it off as best I could.Phew! This was knckering work. It was also frigging freezing!!!

At about 8pm we'd done 3/4 of the floor,and it was looking excellent. , but then Nick got a "you're in trouble" text message from his woman, and my Woman offered to help finish the rest with me....... hmmmmmm?

I Was happy to let Nick go. He's a star! I Know he would have stayed till the end if it was absolutely necessary, and that's a great bloke!!! THANKS MATE!!! I sincerely appreciate your help today!!! :) :)

However, I now had the prospect of 'WOMAN' helping me. This didn't look good. It wasn't any lack of confidence in her abilities. I know she'd do a good job. BUT........ I just knew what was coming next.... and I knew I'd have to nip it in the bud straight away for this concrete pour to both A] Be finished before it sets hard, and B] Be finished to a good standard.

I was cold, wet, exhausted, and simply didn't have any spare energy to cope with the Female Nag Machine. So I said over and over in my head like some mantra.... "I Must not bite! I Must not Bite! I Must not BIte!"


Anyway as predicted it started about 5 minutes into the screeding.

I simply had to take a 10 second breather ( Literally ) before grabbing the wood to screed another section.

"Come one! Get on with it. It's freezing out here!" said woman.

I didn't bite, I sighed and simply turned around and said dryly but assertively "Don't"

Woman understood. However in typical female fashion she still had a yearning to moan about the time it was taking.. And trying to be clever she changed her tactic. The next one was astounding, which I immediately found quite amusing.

The smoothing of the concrete took a lot longer than the actuall screeding process of sliding the wood back and forth. Over the first 3/4 of the floor I had found the smoothing to be a lot quicker if we only screeded about 100mm ( 4" at a time ). This meant I could more easily smooth the new rough bit and blend it in to the already smoothed bit.

However all of a sudden WOMAN turned into a concrete expert. She'd obviously, but wrongly, concluded that screeding more concrete at a time would speed the process up. She was sure of this as she pointed it it out as a definitive statement!

I told her of my recent experiences, which she couldn't argue with. Woman was schtum!! :)

Her latest cunning plan to avoid getting too cold was more subtle and less cutting but none the less a complete failure - HA FUCKING HA!!!! :) :) :)

Eventually she just did the sensible thing and went in the warm while I did the smoothing on my own.

I say all the above with complete affection towards Woman. She did a great job, really put her back into it, and by about 10:30pm we FINALLY got to the last few inches. ( Ooer! :) ) A BIG THANKYOU to..... WOMAN!!!!! :) :) :) xxx

While being totally amazed the concrete was STILL workable at this time I was sudden'y aware of a burnign sensation on my ARSE!!!. I knew exactly what had happened. I had contracted ARSE BURN!! from the stong alkaline in the cement. It started to get very sore.

During the end of the smoothing I began to crouch down i nthe concrete ( because my legs were too tired ), and I'd obviously crouched a bit too far and got a wet arse.

As it was one of those incidents that's funny after a few days, I thought It might as well be funny now. So I had a little chuckle and smoothed down the last.

So far the tally of injuries in the studio build has been

2 x eye injury
1 x ArseBurn

I've been on autopilot for most of the day. I'm not suprised. Despite the time it took, the tiredness, the cold, the wetness and the arseburn, I've felt pretty elated all day. Nothing went wrong ( Woman was close to going wrong, but that got sorted :) ), I had sussed out earlier, that although it was going to be exhausting to be physically exhausting, it wasn't a mentally difficult job. I've had a bit of plastering experience before, and I'm too bad at it, so this was also usefull for the smooth.

The trouble is, when you turn the Autopilot OFF, you are then aware of current conditions. NASTY. The arseburn got worse, and I also realised my hands were absolutely frozen to the bone.

I did clear up afterwards. I had to. But it was the fastest and most painful clearup I've ever done. I just wanted heat.

Soon as I got in I ripped off my gloves, and to my horror my hands were white and shrivelled. I held them in a bowl of warm water for about 10 minutes to revive them.

I then got naked and shoved every bit of clothing straight in the washing machine. Now to check the ArseBurn....

Eek! red as a red thing. It looks like someone has shoved a red hot iron on my but.



The job took a total of 7.5 hours. Had I not decided to hand smooth it, it would have taken maybe 3 hours max

Normally the concrete would be screeded level but rough, and after it was safe to walk on, a Motorised Float ( which looks like a big horizontal fan/hovercraft type device ) would be used to smooth it down.

I would have much preferred this option, however the time frame of being hard enough to walk on but not too hard that it can't be smoothed would have occoured overnight, and I certainly wasn't gonna kill neighbourly relations by firing one of them up at 4am.


Right folks. I'm totally fucked!! Typing this has taken me two hours, where normally it would have taken 15 minutes or so. It will be an earlier night tonight. YAWN YAWN.

I will sleep as a satisfied bunny. The 1st concrete pour was a bit of a scary watershed for this project. It's over! It worked. Cool!

The next job is building the fromwork for the floating slab, sorting out the Sylomer and rebar,etc,etc but NOT tomorrow!

nighty night all


Paul :)

p.s Pictures tomorrow probably.
Paul Woodlock
Strange Being
 
Posts: 2808
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2004 1:32 am
Location: Peterborough UK

Postby Paul Woodlock » Fri Apr 09, 2004 10:53 pm

Friday 09th April 11:55pm

MY ARSE HURTS!! :( :( :(
Paul Woodlock
Strange Being
 
Posts: 2808
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2004 1:32 am
Location: Peterborough UK

Postby Paul Woodlock » Sat Apr 10, 2004 3:31 am

Saturday 9th April 2004 04:10am

My Arse is Still sore, however....

I went in to the garage today, and the concrete is walkable on. Cool!

The first thing I noticed, is the ceiling is now closer to my head.

The second thing I noticed is that the concrete although smooth is a little uneven places. I used a straight edge, and found that there was no more than about 3mm between some peaks and troughs.

Nothing to lose any sleep over.

After chipping of the excess concrete snots arund the edges, I'm gonna set to work and mark out the positions of the Sylomer Elastomer Blocks. Once i've done this I'll inspect every block position and, if need be, I'll level that area off with a creamy paste of water and cement. Dries rock hard!

The plan is..After the blocks have been glued to the concrete, I'll run a string line over them in all directions, and any blocks that are a bit too low, I'll shim up with a thin plastic sheet. Any blocks that are too high...TOUGH! Like Eric said, I guess they'll get squashed down, and almost auto-equalise their level.

I shall start marking out the floor for both the blocks and Floating Floor footprint later today, when I wake up. With the aid of string lines and a cool DIY builders square I built years ago, based on the 3,4,5 triangle. I'll probably have to go out and get a load of cheap thick marker pens as well.

It'll actually be the first time I'll have an accurate dimension for the floating floor, and thus the Studio itself. SO updating the designs will be another task in the next couple of days.

AND.... The piccies are up!!! http://groups.msn.com/PaulsStudioBuildPictures


byeeeee


Paul
Paul Woodlock
Strange Being
 
Posts: 2808
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2004 1:32 am
Location: Peterborough UK

Postby Paul Woodlock » Sun Apr 11, 2004 11:36 pm

MOnday 12th April 2004 00:20am

Greetings!

Advice - Always be well protected when pouring concrete. My arseburn is even more sore now. A scab is starting to form on it. Eek. NEVER AGAIN!!!

Still it coudl be worse. A mate of mine has just told me he has piles. - arrghhh!! ANd probably even more worrying, he blames it on sitting for long periods in his studio.

Ive been backto the designs in the last couple of days. I've drawn out a cutting plan for the Sylomer Blocks.

Sylomer comes in sheets 1.5. x 5m x 25mm thick. I need a sheet 1.5m x 2.0m ( They charge you a cutting fee for ordering 'part sheets'.

Drawing the cutting plan was a cinch. Cutting it won't. But I can afford to have the supplier cut it into the blocks. it would propbably double the price.

After going to a BBQ today, I went into the garage and chiseled off all the concrete 'snots' that were around the edges. I then swept this up,and hoovered the remainign dust. The floor needs to be clean. it's gonna get attacked by black marker pens tomorrow when I start 'Marking out' for the blocks

I also ran string lines for the dimensions of the upper floating floor. This was also easy as the wooden wall strips I fixed to determne the level of the subfloor I've just poured are now cast into the concrete at floor level. I checked with my trusty builders square, and all is, erm, square. Cool!

The concrete is getting harder, Although currently it can be dented with a light blow from a lump hammer. ( I only did this once :) )

On an emotional note, I have to say it feels really good to have got this floor poured. I'm probably not quite on the downhill slope yet, but I'm certainly at the top of the mountain. Once I've done the floating floor, I'll put the skis on and get ready for the ride :)

I also noticed how much the acoustics changed in the garage from having a Soil Floor, a Plastic sheet floor, and now a Concrete floor. It's quite reverberant in there now. It actually sounds really good. Bright Dense and smooth. I estimated the reverb time to be about 2 secs after clapping my hands. Maybe I should use the garage as a reverb chamber. Beat the arse off software reverbs. :)

Right time for a coffee!!

Paul
Paul Woodlock
Strange Being
 
Posts: 2808
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2004 1:32 am
Location: Peterborough UK

Postby Paul Woodlock » Tue Apr 13, 2004 6:11 pm

Tuesday 13th April 2004 6:10pm

Greetings folks

As a break from the Floating Floor, last ngiht I spent a few hours adjusting the internal speaker. PC monitor and desk layour of the studio. An Ergonomic tweak shall we say.

I wan'ted to improve the following.

1] Distance between the mix position and the speakers. It's recommended being at least 2metres ( 6' ) away from my Genelc 1037B's. My current mix position was about 1.5metres. Keeping the equilateral triangle, this of course moved the speakers further apart. it also had the effect of moving the mix position to aroudn 38% of the room length. AS recommended by Wes at RO.

2] Improve the Vertical angle of the Speakers. The conundrum has always been a trade of between PC montors and Audio Monitors. Currently I Use 2 x 19" Monitors, but I Need to add a third. 3 monitos would obscure the Genelecs in the current position.

So using my virtual mix position head in Autocad as a pivot point, I lowered the position of PC monitors considerably. ths allowed me to also lower the angle of the Genelecs more towards the Vertical. This will have the added benefit of a better sound to those sitting in the 'Client Couch'

3] I also needed to alter the dimensions of the Fire escape Door, as with the Genelecs being further apart the door would collide with them. not a big problem though.


As ordering the rubber should be done as asoon as possible, I also did some final tweaks to the Sylomer Elastomer deisgns for the floor. Resulting in LESS Sylomer being needed - Which means a good saving in shekels.

Tip for budding studio designers. A spread sheet and decent CAD program are INVALUABLE!!!! I've changed designs many times along the way. Life is far too short to use pen, paper and an abacus

I also need to find a way of isolating the Genelec monitors from the soffit mount and soffit wall. Thus preventing the whole structure from radiating sound. Genelec recommend a design that has a natural frequency of between 2 and 10Hz.

Initially I wondered if I could use offcuts from the Sylomer P floow elastomer, but a quick trip to the spread sheet confirmed that Sylomer P was far too stiff for the relatively light weight of the Genelecs. They weigh 37Kg ( 81lbs ) each.

If anyone can help here, I would be much appreciative :)

Another little job, I've just done today, is check the plywood formwork is enough to hold 125mm ( 5" ) of wet concrete over the span between teh ruibber blocks. This I checked using 4 bricks and a sheet of teh same thickenss MDF.

The span between the blocks is 580mm, and even at a 700mm span the formwork will hold up the wet concrete easily. Another answered question. Cool! :)


Right! Time to do the final tweaks to the Elastomer Design. Back laters :)


Paul
Paul Woodlock
Strange Being
 
Posts: 2808
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2004 1:32 am
Location: Peterborough UK

Postby MarkEdmonds » Tue Apr 13, 2004 7:06 pm

Just curious Paul - are you planning to introduce a sub-woofer at some point? Anything to match your Genelecs is going to be big (and heavy) so is there anything you can do in advance to help plan the optimum position?
MarkEdmonds
 
Posts: 493
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2004 9:15 pm
Location: Peterborough, UK

Postby Paul Woodlock » Wed Apr 14, 2004 2:38 pm

MarkEdmonds wrote:Just curious Paul - are you planning to introduce a sub-woofer at some point? Anything to match your Genelecs is going to be big (and heavy) so is there anything you can do in advance to help plan the optimum position?


Interesting Question.

The Subwoofer that matches my 1037Ba is the Genelec 7071A http://www.genelec.com/products/7071a/7071a.php

It weighs 81kg ( 178lb ) and extends down to 19Hz. Wow!

The problem is it's damn expensive List price is $4,200 ( Couldn't find a UK price )

So in the short term. PROBABLY NOT :)

To be honest i'm not sure I need a Sub. The Genelecs go down to 37Hz already. I never feel there's a lack of bass :)

The other problem with the Sub is Sound Isolation. I'd need a Floating Floor that has a natural frequency of below 5Hz to cope with that Sub. MAJOR EXPENSE!! I'd have to get Eric to Design me some Springs. :) :)


Paul
Paul Woodlock
Strange Being
 
Posts: 2808
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2004 1:32 am
Location: Peterborough UK

Postby MarkEdmonds » Wed Apr 14, 2004 9:14 pm

Paul Woodlock wrote:The other problem with the Sub is Sound Isolation. I'd need a Floating Floor that has a natural frequency of below 5Hz to cope with that Sub. MAJOR EXPENSE!! I'd have to get Eric to Design me some Springs. :) :)


Paul


I really don't know so this question isn't meant to be as stupid as it might sound: in practical terms, does isolation below a certain frequency (high teens Hz) really matter? I've never really tested my low end hearing but I think I can hear a 20Hz sine wave on headphones but not much under that, ie: point being who is going to be able to hear it?
MarkEdmonds
 
Posts: 493
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2004 9:15 pm
Location: Peterborough, UK

Postby MarkEdmonds » Wed Apr 14, 2004 9:25 pm

OK, update on the above: using the test generator in Nuendo, I can hear pitch down to about 20Hz and then aware of a "presence" down to about 16Hz. Hope it doesn't mash my brain listening to those frequencies at high gain! (This was on headphones connected direct to the output of a Lynx Two).

Don't know if this testing adds to my question but to reiterate, do you really need perfect acoustic isolation below roughly 17Hz?
MarkEdmonds
 
Posts: 493
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2004 9:15 pm
Location: Peterborough, UK

Postby Paul Woodlock » Thu Apr 15, 2004 12:01 am

MarkEdmonds wrote:OK, update on the above: using the test generator in Nuendo, I can hear pitch down to about 20Hz and then aware of a "presence" down to about 16Hz. Hope it doesn't mash my brain listening to those frequencies at high gain! (This was on headphones connected direct to the output of a Lynx Two).

Don't know if this testing adds to my question but to reiterate, do you really need perfect acoustic isolation below roughly 17Hz?


Depends on the application I guess. In industrial situation I would imagine large amounts of low freq energy could be radiated from certain machines. Which need isolating to protect the surrounding structure, never mind the ears.

but in a studio, probably not. Fletcher Munson curves for hearing mean the lows are attenuated at lower levels, which helps with the isolation I guess.

My Flaoting floor will have a natural frequency of around 10Hz. Which means isolation, [ rather than amplification ( from resonance ) ] will start at 10 x 2^0.5 ( sq rt of 2. i.e. around 14 Hz. This means isolation at 14 Hz is zero. then the higher freq you go the more the isolation you'll get.

Basically when designing isolation using elastomers you should design the resonant ( natural freq ) to be at least a couple of octaves below your desired lowest freq of isolation. Which means around 40Hz in my case.

If your interested see http://www.earsc.com/HOME/engineering/TechnicalWhitePapers/Vibration/index.asp?SID=61

The maths is heavy ( I used it to do my calculations + HUGE HELP from Eric Desart - THANKS ERIC!!! :) ], but read the basics and check out the first Transmissability curve on that page and you'll see what I mean about natural frequencies and frequencies of amplication, and frequencies of Isolaton.

This is why people who make floating floors on hockey pucks or other bits of rubber without calculations are basically pissing in the wind.


Paul
Paul Woodlock
Strange Being
 
Posts: 2808
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2004 1:32 am
Location: Peterborough UK

Postby Paul Woodlock » Thu Apr 15, 2004 12:05 am

Thursday 15th April 2004 01:02am


Greetings

I phoned the Sylomer Man Today, and had to leave a message on answerphone. He returned call while I was out, so I'll contact him later today.

I only did a bit of studio work today. When I built the concrete parapets I brought the DPM ( Damp Proof membrane ) upto the top of the parapets. This was 3 brick courses below the DPC ( Damp Proof Course ) of the existing garage and house. SO ive been painting on layer of liquid Damp proof Paint.

Another coat needs to go on later today. I also need to go out and procure some wood to make the formwork sides for the floating concrete slab.

Paul
Last edited by Paul Woodlock on Thu Apr 15, 2004 9:38 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Paul Woodlock
Strange Being
 
Posts: 2808
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2004 1:32 am
Location: Peterborough UK

Postby MarkEdmonds » Thu Apr 15, 2004 8:36 pm

Paul Woodlock wrote:If your interested see http://www.earsc.com/HOME/engineering/TechnicalWhitePapers/Vibration/index.asp?SID=61

The maths is heavy ( I used it to do my calculations + HUGE HELP from Eric Desart - THANKS ERIC!!! :) ], but read the basics and check out the first Transmissability curve on that page and you'll see what I mean about natural frequencies and frequencies of amplication, and frequencies of Isolaton.

This is why people who make floating floors on hockey pucks or other bits of rubber without calculations are basically pissing in the wind.


Paul


Interesting link! Look, I'll be honest - I am not going to understand that maths (over 20 years since I did that stuff) but some of it makes sense. Incredible how invaluable the internet can be for a studio build of the level you are doing.

Mark
MarkEdmonds
 
Posts: 493
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2004 9:15 pm
Location: Peterborough, UK

Postby Paul Woodlock » Thu Apr 15, 2004 9:34 pm

MarkEdmonds wrote:
Paul Woodlock wrote:If your interested see http://www.earsc.com/HOME/engineering/TechnicalWhitePapers/Vibration/index.asp?SID=61

The maths is heavy ( I used it to do my calculations + HUGE HELP from Eric Desart - THANKS ERIC!!! :) ], but read the basics and check out the first Transmissability curve on that page and you'll see what I mean about natural frequencies and frequencies of amplication, and frequencies of Isolaton.

This is why people who make floating floors on hockey pucks or other bits of rubber without calculations are basically pissing in the wind.


Paul


Interesting link! Look, I'll be honest - I am not going to understand that maths (over 20 years since I did that stuff) but some of it makes sense. Incredible how invaluable the internet can be for a studio build of the level you are doing.

Mark


It was 20 years for me as well. However once you get into it it's not so difficult. The key is having the specs of the material itself.

I certainly couldn't have done this project without the Internet and meeting of incredibly generous and knowledgable people like Eric.

It's one of the reasons I'm writing this Diary. To share the practicle knowledge I have built up from doing the project so others can feel more comfortable about building ere own studio.

:)


Paul
Paul Woodlock
Strange Being
 
Posts: 2808
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2004 1:32 am
Location: Peterborough UK

Postby Paul Woodlock » Thu Apr 15, 2004 9:54 pm

Thursday 15th April 10:38pm


Greetingssssssssssssssss

Supply gathering today.

I went out ond bought an 8 by 4 sheet of 18mm MDF,and 35m of 50x50mm wood for the formwork sides. I also managed to find a 25mm thich sheet of polystyrene for the 4th side of the mould. This '4th' side is where the floating slab almost touches the fromt of the garage. The idea is to place the polystyrene before pouring, and once the concrete has cured it can be ripped out. Leaving the necessary gap so the flaoting slab isn't coupled to the existing structure.

When I got back, I painted another coat of Damp Proof paint on the lower walls.

Anther job looming up, which I certainly need to start before laying the Floating Slab, is the Brick pillars that form the structure that will block up the outside door to the garage. The 'cunning plan' with this door is to use the lower half as a fire escape, and brick up the top half. For this I will build two brick pillars either side, and place a concrete lintel on them. From that I can build a brick wall to seal up the rest of the door. I shall build 2 or 3 courses of the pillars in a few days.

I contacted the Rubber Sylomer Man Today. The cost of the Sylomer P will be £915.09 for a 1.5m x 1.3m sheet ( inc VAT and delivery ) That's 1.95 m2

Which works out at £469.27 a square metre. - ARRRGGHHHHHH!!!!!!

The Price of Peace!!!!

Let it be known I'm a tight bastard, so shelling out that many shekels for a piece of rubber is a bit alien to me. I wouldn't mind so much if they threw in 2 or 3 bi-sexual frisky women in with the deal. But sadly not. Just the rubber I'm afraid.

btw - My Arse STILL hurts.It's trying to Scab, but walking of course flexes the wound and breaks the scab. I went to the pharmacy today to see if they had anything to help. Apart from finding my condition highly amusing they recommended some moisturising antiseptic cream.



cya soon :)
Paul
Paul Woodlock
Strange Being
 
Posts: 2808
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2004 1:32 am
Location: Peterborough UK

Postby Paul Woodlock » Sun Apr 18, 2004 12:54 am

Sunday 18th April 2004 01:21am

Greetings

I Had a music session the last couple of days, but I managed by stealth, to fit in a few houirs studio building.

I've now completed 3/4 of the formwork sides. This is a job a lot easier than I imagined. An no injuries to date :) ALthough the Arse still hurts bad, but mroe on that later!

The next layers to go on the Floor are 50mm Elastomer blocks + 18mm Plywood Formwork + 125mm reinforced Concrete slab. Total = 193mm ( 7.5 inches for you americans :) )

As the subfloor isn't, and wasn't expected to be, dead level, simply fixing vertical parrallel sheets of wood 193mm tall over this subfloor is going to transfer those innacurracies up through the floor layers, and into the walls and ceiling as well.

So Yesterdays 'Cunning Plan' was to make the vertical formwork out of 200mm tall sheets of 18mm MDF. After which I can use string lines, and my water level to mark out an exact level line where the top of the floating slab should be. I'll then plane downthe wood to this line. Sorted!

To hold the Formwork in place, I fixed 50mmx50mm (2" x 2" ) lengths of wood to the walls, 50mm from the subfloor, and also fixed 50x50 lengths of wood to the side of the MDF Formwork ( to stiffen it ), again 500mm up frmo the subfloor.

Then using the stringlines already marking the floating floor perimeter, I fixed the MDF Formwork assembly in place by screwing short lengths of wood to bridge the gap between the 50x50 on the wall ,and the 50x50 on the MDF. Easy really :) Piccies to follow soon.

I'm quite pleased with the studio building at the moment, as I've come up with yet another cunning plan to stop cumulative errors creeeping in....

When I glue the Sylomer blocks to the Subfloor, they are not going to be all at the same height. I want them at the same height dammit!! :) I want equal blocks to take an equal load because I'm too much of a perfectionist for my own good sometimes. ;)

The obvious solution is to shim the blocks to an equal level. Two reasons for NOT doing this..

1] Some of the blocks will actually be a few millimetres too tall, so shimming upto level of highest would decrease the floor thickness.

2] Shimming sounds so fuckign boring and tedious. Yawn! I'd have to find some suitable shimming material. Cuit it into rectangles, and piss about gluing it in place. Lots of times.

So the Cunning Plan is to use the Plywood formwork itself to equalise the level by routing variable depth 'wells' in the botoom of it.

Once I've produced a map of the block heights ( which I'd have to do for shimming anyway ) this would be easy. For example, If the highest block is 5mm above the lowest block, I'd route out a 5mm 'well' where the plywood sits on the highest block. And so on for all the blocks.

Maybe I am being too precise with all this, but I'm doing it for peace of mind really. I want to sit in the studio when It's finsihed, and not feel "I could have done better!"

Anyway I'm gonna make some music.

cya laters :)


Paul
Paul Woodlock
Strange Being
 
Posts: 2808
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2004 1:32 am
Location: Peterborough UK

Postby Paul Woodlock » Mon Apr 19, 2004 12:07 am

Monday 19th April 2004 00:42am

Greetings Fellow Earthlings :)

Did good days work on the Studio today. Cool! :)

I finished the Vertical formwork in record time!

I then ran a string line across the room in order to mark the correct floating slab height.

My master reference for accurately measuring each stage of the floor build is a wooden strip I fixed to the wall. The bottom of which is the top of the floating slab.

The wooden strip is 47mm high, and has lots of small nails knocked in to tie string to.

Therefore once I've stretched a piece of string frmo nail to nail, I simply have to measure down 47mm, and mark offthe level.

Advice for studio builders: Get a water level. ( basically two clear plastic measuring cylinders, connected by a long flexible plastic tube ) Once filled with water they are really easy to use, and very accurate over large distances, even when there's obstructions in the path between the two measuring points.

I must say the last couple of minutes has been extremely painful. I've just written out a cheque for £915.09 for slab of rubber. Woman is going to post it off from work tomorrow.

Arse Update:

Although it is healing up, it's really painful now. It's OK when I'm stasnding up, and anyway, I was dusting myself down after finishing building the formwork area, and as I was slapping dust off my arse, I hit the burn area. --- ARRRRRGGHHHHH!!!!

Now that fucking HURT!!! bigtime!!!!.

Current Studio Build Injury list

1] Eye injury
2] Eye Injury
3] Arse Burn
4] Paying for the Sylomer

byeeeee :)



Paul
Paul Woodlock
Strange Being
 
Posts: 2808
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2004 1:32 am
Location: Peterborough UK

Postby Bob » Mon Apr 19, 2004 11:11 am

Hi Paul:

If you find yourself with some time on your hands (waiting for cement?) and want to read about the disasters of others, then have a look at http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthre ... did=379464 which is entitled " The lighter side - Share Your DIY blunders " Most of it is about mistakes people made in making their home theaters, but some is about general home renovation mistakes, and others are just plain blunders and accidents in the real world. it's one of the most amusing threads that I read.
Regards
Bob Golds
"The only thing we regret in life is the love we failed to give."
"Be a rapturist -- the backward of a terrorist. Commit random acts of senseless kindness, whenever possible" - Jake Stonebender
Bob
 
Posts: 4360
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2004 4:37 am
Location: Oakville, Ontario, Canada

Postby Paul Woodlock » Mon Apr 19, 2004 4:01 pm

Bob wrote:Hi Paul:

If you find yourself with some time on your hands (waiting for cement?) and want to read about the disasters of others, then have a look at http://www.avsforum.com/avs-vb/showthre ... did=379464 which is entitled " The lighter side - Share Your DIY blunders " Most of it is about mistakes people made in making their home theaters, but some is about general home renovation mistakes, and others are just plain blunders and accidents in the real world. it's one of the most amusing threads that I read.


LOL!

Just spent an a hour reading those. Thansk Bob :)

This was the funniest though....

http://www.nmsu.edu/~safety/news/auto-safety-overloaded-car1.htm


And there's me worrying about carting only 3 sheets of 18mm MDF on my roof rack :)


Paul
Paul Woodlock
Strange Being
 
Posts: 2808
Joined: Mon Feb 02, 2004 1:32 am
Location: Peterborough UK

Postby MarkEdmonds » Mon Apr 19, 2004 9:21 pm

LOL!!! One and a half tonnes on the back axle of a Jetta!!!


(There is something a bit dodgy about it to me though - how did they load it? Are they really bags of concrete on the back seat? How is the top load being prevented from sliding off the back? Looks like some ties are attached to the door handles! Great photo though!)
MarkEdmonds
 
Posts: 493
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2004 9:15 pm
Location: Peterborough, UK

Postby Bob » Mon Apr 19, 2004 9:45 pm

MarkEdmonds wrote: something a bit dodgy about it to me though


http://www.snopes.com/photos/lumber.asp
Bob
 
Posts: 4360
Joined: Sun Feb 08, 2004 4:37 am
Location: Oakville, Ontario, Canada

PreviousNext

Return to Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Majestic-12 [Bot] and 4 guests