Dog Boxes

coming soon

Dog Boxes

Postby archive » Mon Apr 12, 2004 3:58 am

From: "Patrick D. Olguin" <drpat@p...>
Date: Wed Jan 19, 2000 12:54 am
Subject: Dog Boxes

I have a pair of ATC SCM-300's that we will be building dog boxes for,
however, I haven't found much information on theory and construction
details for the boxes. These are some of the questions that I have:

1. Should I close the backs or not? If it is closed, where is the best
place to poke the hole for the cable entrance.

2. Should I line the side cavities with fiberglass?

3. The speakers will be mounted above a window and therefore will be
tilted downward. Am I running the risk of the speakers falling forward
because of this? If so, how do I secure them properly so that they don't
fall out?

4. I'm assuming that the cracks around the front need to be sealed
airtight so that bass will not travel from the back to combine. What is
the best way to approach this?

Any help or pointers in the right direction is appreciated.

Peace,
Patrick D. Olguin
archive
 
Posts: 4697
Joined: Sun Mar 21, 2004 6:26 am

Postby archive » Mon Apr 12, 2004 3:59 am

From: Bill Thompson <Bill@A...>
Date: Wed Jan 19, 2000 3:35 pm
Subject: Re: Dog Boxes

Greetings...

I've never tried mounting speakers above a window, but I can tell you that
I've had great success with a couple of tricks...

>1. Should I close the backs or not? If it is closed, where is the best
>place to poke the hole for the cable entrance.

It depends on whether or not you need isolation at the back. In my case,
the speakers are in soffits in the front corners of a single room studio,
although in other cases the common wall has separated a control room from
recording space, in either case, I needed isolation, so I built a sealed
cavity.

I also use very large cavities, an option that may not be open to you. In
my case, I have always mounted the speakers on speaker stands filled with
sand, and then placed a wall over them.

>2. Should I line the side cavities with fiberglass?

Depending on the size of the cavity I'm not sure what good this would do.

>3. The speakers will be mounted above a window and therefore will be
>tilted downward. Am I running the risk of the speakers falling forward
>because of this? If so, how do I secure them properly so that they don't
>fall out?

If they are leaning just a little the opening and shelf should be enough,
if they are leaning a lot you may want to secure them with some kind of
rubber damper (I use those stupid exhaust system hangers VW used to use on
Rabbits.)

>4. I'm assuming that the cracks around the front need to be sealed
>airtight so that bass will not travel from the back to combine. What is
>the best way to approach this?

I have always tried to make the opening reasonably airtight, I'm not sure
if it is absolutely necessary in your case, or even mine<G>. A friend of
mine and I came up with a fairly clever little trick. The opening for the
speaker is framed with 2x3's approximately 3/8" larger than the speaker. We
covered the 2x3 with 3/8" thick neoprene, and then shaved it so that it was
only 1/4" thick at the back. This way we could slide the cover over the
speaker, on or off, without a lot of hassle. Don't laugh too hard, it
really works.

Hope this helps...

Bill
archive
 
Posts: 4697
Joined: Sun Mar 21, 2004 6:26 am

Postby archive » Mon Apr 12, 2004 3:59 am

From: SRF7@a...
Date: Wed Jan 19, 2000 3:56 pm
Subject: Re: Dog Boxes



I'm not familiar with the quoted model monitors, but assuming they have no
side or rear ports/passive radiators (all the sound comes out the front),
then build a stiff box (MDF would do), stuff this gaps with fiberglass (to
help mechanically decouple the speakers from the box and the rest of the wall
structure), mount the speakers so that they are even and flush to the wall
(if you want to angle them down then install an angled soffit board across
the top of the wall at the appropriate angle) then seal the gap around the
speakers with acoustic caulk (so that resonances inside the dog house box es
don't "talk" to the room).

As to speaker cable, just drill a hole, pull the cable, and caulk around it.

That's how I'd do it anyway.

Alternatively you could hang the speakers off the wall and down to the lowest
level which preserves site lines through your window. Maybe unistrut bolted
to the ceiling, and an articulated mounting arm screwed to the top of the
speakers.

If you can't find an appropriate mounting arm, make a fixed angle bracket
that grabs the speaker (top and bottom) out of all-thread rod and unistrut
(with a little rubber padding), then hang the whole unit from a piece of
unistrut with a piece of all-thread and a unistrut hanger at the ceiling.
(If you painted the whole thing black it might even look cool). Ny-tie the
speaker cable to the hanger and then run it through the attic back to a
convenient wall jack.

My $.02 worth

Scott R. Foster
archive
 
Posts: 4697
Joined: Sun Mar 21, 2004 6:26 am

Postby archive » Mon Apr 12, 2004 4:01 am

From: "Patrick D. Olguin" <drpat@p...>
Date: Fri Jan 21, 2000 1:30 am
Subject: Re: Dog Boxes

Bill Thompson wrote:
>
> From: Bill Thompson <Bill@A...>
>
> Greetings...
>
> I've never tried mounting speakers above a window, but I can tell you that
> I've had great success with a couple of tricks...
>
> >1. Should I close the backs or not? If it is closed, where is the best
> >place to poke the hole for the cable entrance.
>
> It depends on whether or not you need isolation at the back. In my case,
> the speakers are in soffits in the front corners of a single room studio,
> although in other cases the common wall has separated a control room from
> recording space, in either case, I needed isolation, so I built a sealed
> cavity.

I was thinking the same thing. Since ther will be a studio on the other
side, I'll probably end up using a couple of layers of material all the
way around to improve isolation.

>
> I also use very large cavities, an option that may not be open to you. In
> my case, I have always mounted the speakers on speaker stands filled with
> sand, and then placed a wall over them.
>
> >2. Should I line the side cavities with fiberglass?
>
> Depending on the size of the cavity I'm not sure what good this would do.

I'm mostly concerned with cavity resonances building up and coloring the
sound.

>
> >3. The speakers will be mounted above a window and therefore will be
> >tilted downward. Am I running the risk of the speakers falling forward
> >because of this? If so, how do I secure them properly so that they don't
> >fall out?
>
> If they are leaning just a little the opening and shelf should be enough,
> if they are leaning a lot you may want to secure them with some kind of
> rubber damper (I use those stupid exhaust system hangers VW used to use on
> Rabbits.)

I'll probably end up making separate boxes and rigidly mount them to the
shelf with a shim on the back to tilt them down at the angle that I'll
need. Then I could probably stuff rubber isolators between the boxes and
the speakers (all of the way around the speaker) to keep them in the
boxes...I don't know. How do you secure the VW dampers that you're
talking about, to the speakers. Do you screw them directly to the
speaker?

>
> >4. I'm assuming that the cracks around the front need to be sealed
> >airtight so that bass will not travel from the back to combine. What is
> >the best way to approach this?
>
> I have always tried to make the opening reasonably airtight, I'm not sure
> if it is absolutely necessary in your case, or even mine<G>. A friend of
> mine and I came up with a fairly clever little trick. The opening for the
> speaker is framed with 2x3's approximately 3/8" larger than the speaker. We
> covered the 2x3 with 3/8" thick neoprene, and then shaved it so that it was
> only 1/4" thick at the back. This way we could slide the cover over the
> speaker, on or off, without a lot of hassle. Don't laugh too hard, it
> really works.

Great trick. That sure beats prying the trim off if you ever need to
pull the speakers out.

>
> Hope this helps...

It does. Thanks,
Patrick D. Olguin

>
> Bill
archive
 
Posts: 4697
Joined: Sun Mar 21, 2004 6:26 am


Return to 2000 posts

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest