Unhealthy 703?

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Unhealthy 703?

Postby archive » Mon Apr 12, 2004 4:03 am

From: Catacol Records <andy@c...>
Date: (Date Unavailable)
Subject: Unhealthy 703?

Hello list,

I bought some slabs of semi-rigid fiber glass, the equivalent of 703,
(which isn't available in the UK). I am a little concerned about this
stuff being a possible health risk. The manufacturer recommends using a
face mask and gloves when handling it. OK, not a problem, but what about
after the slabs are in place?
I don't want to sit in my studio and inhale a lot of microscopic glass
fibres (the 20 or so Marlboros are bad enough...). Mr. "Acoustics"
Everest just states that 703 is usually covered with fabric for cosmetic
reasons, but does not elaborate on the kind of fabric. What kind would
you recommend to a) avoid any unwanted effect on sound absorption and b)
prevent any of the glass fibres from "escaping"?
I hope I am just over cautious, but since I don't really know a lot about
this stuff, I thought I better check with the experts. Many thanks in
advance.

Best regards

Andy

Catacol Records
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Postby archive » Mon Apr 12, 2004 4:03 am

From: Mark Plancke <soundtch@M...>
Date: Tue Jan 25, 2000 2:12 pm
Subject: Re: Unhealthy 703?


Burlap, available from your local fabric store in many different colors.

Mark Plancke
SOUNDTECH RECORDING STUDIOS
http://SOUNDTECHRECORDING.COM
Windsor, Ontario Canada
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Postby archive » Mon Apr 12, 2004 4:12 am

From: "Nestor Natividade" <oraculo@s...>
Date: Tue Jan 25, 2000 3:48 pm
Subject: about unhealthy glass and rock wool


Hi Andy,
You can use any fabric which applies the term 'acoustically transparent' to
cover the glass or rock wool stuff. A better way is to use a non-woven fabric
(BIDIM, from RHODIA, or any similar) with a thin thickness (just one
millimeter). You can find non-woven tissues in black or white colors and they
are cheap. Over the non-woven tissue you can apply any other acoustically
transparent decorative fabric. Please, don't use any glue between the wool and
BIDIM/decorative fabric: the wool must 'breath'! Alternatively, itsn't the
best way, but you can substitute the BIDIM with a very very thin polyethilene
film. Finally, in Europe ISOVER/Saint Gobain produces glass wool panels covered
with beautiful fabrics; its catalogue carries the necessary alfa values per
octave.
Best regards,
Nestor
Somperfeito, Brasil.
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Postby archive » Mon Apr 12, 2004 4:13 am

From: thomas ness <user654308@w...>
Date: Tue Jan 25, 2000 4:11 pm
Subject: Re: about unhealthy glass and rock wool

One thing to remember is that none of the suggestions made so far
address flammability. Treated fabrics are more expensive, but they are
recommended or required depending on your local codes. Also, they are a
good idea if you allow smoking in the studio, since even a minor fire
could damage or destroy a lot of expensive equipment.

Thom Ness
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Postby archive » Mon Apr 12, 2004 4:13 am

From: Brian Marston <marstonb@z...>
Date: Tue Jan 25, 2000 8:59 pm
Subject: Re: Unhealthy 703?



Heavy gloves will protect your hands from fibres getting stuck in your
skin through direct rough handling of the material. During handling and
cutting you will be knocking fibres free from the surfaces. This is the
time when most fibres will break free and drift around in the air when
they can be inhaled. Use the mask to stop inhaling them.

After installation vacuum the area to rid the studio of loose fibres.
Any open weave cloth over the surface will hold fibres that may be
broken away in the future due people knocking against the surface,
without significantly affecting the absorptive qualities.

An occupational hazard of working continually with fibreglass (handling
and cutting) is possible scaring of the lung tissue. The same
precautions apply to "rock wool" or "slag wool". Once installed and away
from continual physical contact the material is very stable and safe.

Brian Marston
Consulting Acoustical Engineer
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Postby archive » Mon Apr 12, 2004 4:14 am

From: SRF7@a...
Date: Tue Jan 25, 2000 10:08 pm
Subject: Re: Unhealthy 703?



Mark's right, burlap is an excellent choice. cheap, and it takes dye easily.

If you go the dye route ... might as well tie dye it eh?

Oh Behave! Does it make you horny baby?

Oh yeah ... Burlap though cheap should be treated with a fire retardant.
Either buy a spray on product (I think 3m makes one) or I hear that you can
make your own by putting some borax in hot water and then soaking the fabric
(or maybe put borax in with the dye in the dye bucket if you go that route).
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Postby archive » Mon Apr 12, 2004 4:14 am

From: "CactusFire (A.S.)" <cactusfire@c...>
Date: Tue Jan 25, 2000 11:18 pm
Subject: Re: Unhealthy 703?

Here's my 2¢ worth of tidbits about covering 703.

I found out that there are some people who are allergic to burlap. Not one has
ever come into my studio, but this may be something you want to think about.

Rose Brand theatrical supply sells a fire retardant that should work well. They
also sell a wide range of fabrics for not-too-steep prices.

Personally, I find 703 to be the least irritating of fiberglass products.
Working with the rolls of pink stuff is much more disturbing than with 703, for
some reason.

Almost the entire ceiling of my tracking room is covered in 4" of 703, wrapped
with burlap. I dyed the burlap with diluted india ink, which was inexpensive,
and turned the burlap a nice faded black. I have never noticed one shred of
fiberglass on the floor of the studio, but many people do first cover the 703
with cotton muslin, which is very inexpensive and quite thin.

For the new control room, I splurged and bought the Guilford fabric that ASC
used to cover Tube Traps. This is apparently "acoustically transparent", but it
also looks very nice and is much more durable the burlap.

Good luck,

A.
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Postby archive » Mon Apr 12, 2004 4:25 am

From: "Dan Nelson" <dprimary@h...>
Date: Sat Jan 29, 2000 2:03 pm
Subject: Re: Unhealthy 703?

Another thing you can do is after you mount the 703 is spray paint them to
bond any loose glass fibers to the panel, just paint them until the panel
starts to take on the color of the paint.

Dan Nelson
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Postby archive » Mon Apr 12, 2004 4:27 am

From: GonÁalo Coelho <goncalo_coelho@h...>
Date: Sun Jan 30, 2000 12:05 am
Subject: Re: Unhealthy 703?

Dan Nelson wrote:
>>Another thing you can do is after you mount the 703 is spray paint them to
bond any loose glass fibers to the panel, just paint them until the panel
starts to take on the color of the paint.<<

Wouldn¥t that hurt the absortion coeficient of the fiberglass? I mean, since
alot of atention is paid to the tissues that are normally used to cover it,
does it has to be a specific paint?

GonÁalo C.
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Postby archive » Mon Apr 12, 2004 4:28 am

From: "Dan Nelson" <dprimary@h...>
Date: Sun Jan 30, 2000 8:29 am
Subject: Re: Unhealthy 703?

It should not change the the absorption of the 703, all the paint is doing
is rebonding the loose fibers to panel.

Dan Nelson
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