Caulking when cold?

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Caulking when cold?

Postby archive » Wed Mar 31, 2004 4:00 am

From: info@d...
Date: Sat Jan 20, 2001 6:34 pm
Subject: Caulking when cold?

Hello,

I am using G.E. Silicon caulk in my room. It is not truly
an "acoustical" caulk that remains "wet", but once dry, it is VERY
flexible and "rubbery". For my purposes right now, this is more than
adequate. Note for anyone who might be using this heavy-duty G.E
silicon from Home Depot... it is pretty expensive when bought by the
single tube, by sometimes on another rack elsewhere in the store, it
is packaged as three tubes in one wrapper... and this "three-bundle"
is much cheaper per tube... same exact stuff. If you buy three
single tubes not in the bundle wrapper, you will pay top dollar...
you need to find that "three-tube" package.

ANYWAY... my question... I need to start caulking my room again, and
the average temperature here now is 30 degrees F. I can;t remember
exactly what it says on the caulk package, but I'm sure that it is
recommended to use the caulk in temperatures above 40 F. But,
there's really no way I can raise the temperature, and I cannot wait
until spring time. Any thoughts?

My plan is to just apply the caulk regardless of the cold... hey, if
it does not dry properly, maybe that's even better... as long as it
remains in the crevices in which it is applied. It is all indoor and
will never be exposed to water. The caulking is for soundproof
reasons only.

Are there any reasons why I should NOT apply this caulking now in 20 -
30 degree F temperatures? One fear is that maybe the adhesive
characteristic might be reduced, and the caulk might lift off
eventually. I suppose I should contact G.E. directly with this
question, but I'm sure that once they would respond to me two years
later, they will simply tell me to follow the instructions on the
tube, period.

Thanks. -dave
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Postby archive » Wed Mar 31, 2004 4:02 am

From: steve <whitaker@p...>
Date: Sun Jan 21, 2001 7:42 am
Subject: Re: Caulking when cold?

Hello,

The GE RTV has been used successfully in speaker construcyion for years.
It is "Room Temperature Vulcanizing and uses Acetic acid in the cure
(smells like vinigar) There is a more recent GE caulk which uses Amonia
for curing.
The amonia cure costs more (around here) and my experience has been less
favorable with it as a sealant.
But the amonia cure is paintable, whereas the vinigar cure isn't

as for heating your room to the low temp recommendations, just put in a
space heater. Electric, or fuel, whichever is needed.

steve
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Postby archive » Wed Mar 31, 2004 4:12 am

From: SRF7@a...
Date: Sun Jan 21, 2001 4:35 pm
Subject: Re: [acoustics] Caulking when cold?

In a message dated 1/20/01 10:47:15 AM Pacific Standard Time,
info@d... writes:

> it is pretty expensive when bought by the
> single tube, by sometimes on another rack elsewhere in the store, it
> is packaged as three tubes in one wrapper... and this "three-bundle"
> is much cheaper per tube... same exact stuff. If you buy three
> single tubes not in the bundle wrapper, you will pay top dollar...
> you need to find that "three-tube" package.
>
> ANYWAY... my question... I need to start caulking my room again, and
> the average temperature here now is 30 degrees F. I can;t remember
> exactly what it says on the caulk package, but I'm sure that it is
> recommended to use the caulk in temperatures above 40 F. But,
> there's really no way I can raise the temperature, and I cannot wait
> until spring time. Any thoughts?
>

First look for a construction supply house in your area that sells caulk.
Professional grade caulks are better than anything at Ho'De'Po'. Caulk by
the case is tons cheaper, and you can talk to an expert (the guy at the
counter has all the tech literature right there) about all the details of
your application (temp. and otherwise).

You can burn through a case of caulk in no time if you are doing it right,
and it pays off bigtime in the performance of your ceilings and walls). I
used 3-1/2 cases in a 1,000 sf studio.

Big tubes of caulk are cheaper still (longer with a larger diameter). But
you need a big gun (probably a break even proposition to buy one - sweet if
you can borrow one.)

As to temp, do what the pro's do ... rent a fan driven big propane heater.
Would also help to keep the cases of caulk inside, so they start out warm.

Scott R. Foster
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