Heating in converted garage studio

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Heating in converted garage studio

Postby archive » Wed Mar 31, 2004 4:01 am

From: "Terry Lawhon" <tlawhon@c...>
Date: Sat Jan 20, 2001 7:32 pm
Subject: [acoustics] Heating in converted garage studio

Greetings all,

I am embarking on a project to convert a large stand-alone garage to a
combination office and studio. I am at the planning stage, and need to
decide soon about the method I will use for heating and possibly cooling the
structure.

I live in northern California and it gets fairly cold during the winter
(with snow) so heating is important. The entire structure is approximately
25' x 31' with 11' ceilings inside. The options here for energy source are
electric, propane, wood, and something called monitor heat, which is based
on kerosene. Any and all input is appreciated.

Terry Lawhon
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Postby archive » Wed Mar 31, 2004 4:01 am

From: "Dave Martin" <dave.martin@n...>
Date: Sat Jan 20, 2001 10:18 pm
Subject: Re: [acoustics] Heating in converted garage studio

You might want to spend a little time figuring out how much heat is coming
off your equipment - Depending on the amount of equipment and insulation
that you install, you may not need heating at all. Cooling, on the other
hand, is a completely different issue.

Dave Martin
DMA, Inc.
Nashville, TN
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Postby archive » Wed Mar 31, 2004 4:13 am

From: SRF7@a...
Date: Sun Jan 21, 2001 4:48 pm
Subject: Re: [acoustics] Heating in converted garage studio

In a message dated 1/20/01 11:36:52 AM Pacific Standard Time,
tlawhon@c... writes:

> I live in northern California and it gets fairly cold during the winter
> (with snow) so heating is important. The entire structure is approximately
> 25' x 31' with 11' ceilings inside. The options here for energy source are
> electric, propane, wood, and something called monitor heat, which is based
> on kerosene. Any and all input is appreciated.
>
> Terry Lawhon

Given that you are in CA you probably should let economical operation drive
your choice (windmills, might be cheapest in the long run).

Any style of heater can be conveyed in a manner acousically rational.

Stay away from metal duct/vent/chimney work that crosses from the mechanical
room to the studio work spaces. Build a mechanical room and do any required
metal ducting directly from this space to the outside/attic.

In connections to the workspaces use oversized flexible ducting. Split leg
the system to the different work areas as close to the supply fan and main
return as possible (just above the air handler). Run extra long ess shaped
runs to put curves in the duct work (sound doesn't go around corners very
well).

If you do all of the above and you buy a quiet unit (some are much noiser
than others - talk about this to your HVAC supplier) you can probably avoid
building baffle boxes etc. I probably used about twice the length of
flexible duct that my rooms would normaly have required ... but I can't hear
ANYTHING from my system ... feeling the warm or cold air is the only clue as
to whether the system is on.

Scott R. Foster
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Postby archive » Wed Mar 31, 2004 4:16 am

From: "Sjoerd Koppert" <sjoerd@n...>
Date: Mon Jan 22, 2001 9:32 am
Subject: Re: Heating in converted garage studio

--- In acoustics@e????ups.com, SRF7@a... wrote:
> In a message dated 1/20/01 11:36:52 AM Pacific Standard Time,
> tlawhon@c... writes:
>
>
> > I live in northern California and it gets fairly cold during the
winter
> > (with snow) so heating is important. The entire structure is
approximately
> > 25' x 31' with 11' ceilings inside. The options here for energy
source are
> > electric, propane, wood, and something called monitor heat, which
is based
> > on kerosene. Any and all input is appreciated.
> >
> > Terry Lawhon
>
> Given that you are in CA you probably should let economical
operation drive
> your choice (windmills, might be cheapest in the long run).
>
> Any style of heater can be conveyed in a manner acousically
rational.
>
> Stay away from metal duct/vent/chimney work that crosses from the
mechanical
> room to the studio work spaces. Build a mechanical room and do any
required
> metal ducting directly from this space to the outside/attic.
>
> In connections to the workspaces use oversized flexible ducting.
Split leg
> the system to the different work areas as close to the supply fan
and main
> return as possible (just above the air handler). Run extra long
ess shaped
> runs to put curves in the duct work (sound doesn't go around
corners very
> well).
>
> If you do all of the above and you buy a quiet unit (some are much
noiser
> than others - talk about this to your HVAC supplier) you can
probably avoid
> building baffle boxes etc. I probably used about twice the length
of
> flexible duct that my rooms would normaly have required ... but I
can't hear
> ANYTHING from my system ... feeling the warm or cold air is the
only clue as
> to whether the system is on.
>
> Scott R. Foster
>
And then of cause there is insulated flexible duct, which goes around
corners like a dream and absorbs all sound.
>
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Postby archive » Wed Mar 31, 2004 4:16 am

From: SRF7@a...
Date: Mon Jan 22, 2001 3:12 pm
Subject: Re: [acoustics] Re: Heating in converted garage studio

In a message dated 1/22/01 1:33:23 AM Pacific Standard Time,
sjoerd@n... writes:

> And then of cause there is insulated flexible duct, which goes around
> corners like a dream and absorbs all sound.
> >

That's what I'm talking about.... its a black plastic tube with a spiral if
wire inside to hold its round shape, this is covered in a thin layer of
fiberglass and the exterior is covered in foil. Its flexible, so it can run
in and around trusses and corners. Its cushy from the insulation so it tends
to absorb any vibration. Worlds better than an all metal system which can
convey sound amazingly well.

Run a bit extra so that you have no straight runs (make every leg an ess
shape) and Bob's your Uncle.

Scott R. Foster
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Postby archive » Wed Mar 31, 2004 4:19 am

From: Lou D <MR_LOU_D@y...>
Date: Tue Jan 23, 2001 4:53 pm
Subject: Re:[3] Heating in converted garage studio

What's the typical (that you've seen) diameter of the insulated flexible duct?

Thanks,

Lou.
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Postby archive » Wed Mar 31, 2004 4:19 am

From: "Sjoerd Koppert" <sjoerd@n...>
Date: Tue Jan 23, 2001 5:28 pm
Subject: Re:[3] Heating in converted garage studio

--- In acoustics@e????ups.com, Lou D <MR_LOU_D@y...> wrote:
> What's the typical (that you've seen) diameter of the insulated
flexible duct?
>
> Thanks,
>
> Lou.
>
> For my system I have used 10" diameter JP Lamborn flexible insulated
duct for the air inlets and outlets of the system. For the inlets -
the filter is only 3" away from the fan - I used 10 feet of duct
coiled, which absorbs all the air noise beautifully.
In addition, I am running a 6" diameter duct which cools the main
outboard gear rack and the monitor soffits.

> >> Subject: Re: Re: Heating in converted garage studio
> >>
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