Plywood

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Plywood

Postby archive » Sun Apr 11, 2004 4:33 am

From: "Jose Ramon San Juan" <sanjuanjr@x????xxx.xxx
Date: Sun Nov 28, 1999 12:48 am
Subject: Plywood

What's exactly plywood. My dictionary gives me three different meanings.

Jose Ramon
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Postby archive » Sun Apr 11, 2004 4:34 am

From: Dan Nelson <dprimary@e...>
Date: Sun Nov 28, 1999 4:49 pm
Subject: Re: Plywood

Plywood is thin sheets of wood "plys" glued together into thicker sheets. The
grain of each layer is run perpendicular to the next layer. Let me know what
plywood is called in your country so I can add it to the materials page

Dan Nelson
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Postby archive » Sun Apr 11, 2004 4:34 am

From: "Jose Ramon San Juan" <sanjuanjr@x????xxx.xxx
Date: Sun Nov 28, 1999 5:33 pm
Subject: RE: Plywood

I know nothing about manufactured wood. Possibly it is "madera
contrachapada", as Carlos Garcia told. Certainly you must include his site
in your international links section. I've visited it and it's very well made
and very interesting (in spanish)
In his message he says that drywall is an airtight wall made of bricks or
stones. I'v always read (at your site too) that it's a gypsum board. What's
the truth?

Jose Ramon
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Postby archive » Sun Apr 11, 2004 4:35 am

From: john/blackcabin <rockin@x?????xxxx.xxxx
Date: Sun Nov 28, 1999 10:55 pm
Subject: Re: Plywood

Jose Ramon San Juan wrote:
>
> From: "Jose Ramon San Juan" <sanjuanjr@r...>
>
> I know nothing about manufactured wood. Possibly it is "madera
> contrachapada", as Carlos Garcia told.

How about this...

I went and asked the crew building a house down the road.
They are just calling plywood, "contrachapado".
The foreman said it could also be called "madera laminada" because it
is indeed "laminated timber" but that could also imply that it was
laminated wood beams or trusses or some of the new laminated floor
joist systems.

Does this help or make any sense ?

John
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the little house that rocks
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931-358-0114

"I turn the good parts up and turn the bad ones down."
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Postby archive » Sun Apr 11, 2004 4:35 am

From: john/blackcabin <rockin@x?????xxxx.xxxx
Date: Sun Nov 28, 1999 10:37 pm
Subject: Re: Plywood

Jose Ramon San Juan wrote:

> In his message he says that drywall is an airtight wall made of bricks or
> stones. I'v always read (at your site too) that it's a gypsum board. What's
> the truth?

Hmmm... ain't the American version of the English language wonderful ?
Here's the poop as I understand it...

1) Traditionally and by definition, a "drywall" is indeed a wall made
of bricks, blocks, stones and earth.
By its very nature it will usually be airtight though not necessarily so.
The drywall is usually held together by pressure fitting and
keystoning the components together without the use of mortar or other
"wet" mediums as a bonding agent.
I believe some of the older dikes in Holland are constructed using
this method as is the Great Wall in China.

2) In the US (and now in Canada from what I hear), "gypsum board" or
"wallboard" is refered to as "drywall".
This originates from the modern day practice of substituting gypsum
board in lieu of plaster (wet) and lath (board) techniques when
skinning a wall.

Hope this clears up some of the confusion.

John
--
the little house that rocks
www.blackcabin.com
931-358-0114

"I turn the good parts up and turn the bad ones down."
- producer Jim Dickinson -
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Postby archive » Sun Apr 11, 2004 4:36 am

From: "Jose Ramon San Juan" <sanjuanjr@x????xxx.xxx
Date: Mon Nov 29, 1999 2:31 am
Subject: RE: Plywood

> How about this...
>
> I went and asked the crew building a house down the road.
> They are just calling plywood, "contrachapado".
> The foreman said it could also be called "madera laminada" because it
> is indeed "laminated timber" but that could also imply that it was
> laminated wood beams or trusses or some of the new laminated floor
> joist systems.
>
> Does this help or make any sense ?

Absolutely, the dictionary tells "madera contrachapada" and "madera
multilaminar". In any case I think that it must be made, as Dan Nelson told,
this way: the grain of each layer is run perpendicular to the next layer.

Jose Ramon
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Postby archive » Sun Apr 11, 2004 4:36 am

From: "Jose Ramon San Juan" <sanjuanjr@x????xxx.xxx
Date: Mon Nov 29, 1999 2:40 am
Subject: RE: Plywood

> Hmmm... ain't the American version of the English language wonderful ?
> Here's the poop as I understand it...
>
> 1) Traditionally and by definition, a "drywall" is indeed a wall made
> of bricks, blocks, stones and earth.
> By its very nature it will usually be airtight though not necessarily so.
> The drywall is usually held together by pressure fitting and
> keystoning the components together without the use of mortar or other
> "wet" mediums as a bonding agent.
> I believe some of the older dikes in Holland are constructed using
> this method as is the Great Wall in China.
>
> 2) In the US (and now in Canada from what I hear), "gypsum board" or
> "wallboard" is refered to as "drywall".
> This originates from the modern day practice of substituting gypsum
> board in lieu of plaster (wet) and lath (board) techniques when
> skinning a wall.

Well, but when speaking about acoustics everybody seems to consider
exclusively drywall as a gypsum board and some of these products seems to be
made specially for acoustic use.
>
> Hope this clears up some of the confusion.

Sure. My doubts are gone away. Thank you.

Jose Ramon
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Postby archive » Sun Apr 11, 2004 4:36 am

From: "Ty Ford" <tford@j...>
Date: Thu Jan 1, 1970 4:59 am
Subject: RE: Plywood

>From: "Jose Ramon San Juan" <sanjuanjr@r...>
>
>I know nothing about manufactured wood. Possibly it is "madera
>contrachapada", as Carlos Garcia told. Certainly you must include his site
>in your international links section. I've visited it and it's very well made
>and very interesting (in spanish)
> In his message he says that drywall is an airtight wall made of bricks or
>stones. I'v always read (at your site too) that it's a gypsum board. What's
>the truth?

Hola Jose,

I saw the above post and thought I could help. A "Dry Wall" is usually an
exterior construction. A wall made without mortar (wet). Drywall is a a man
made material, probably gypsum, that comes in 4 foot by 8 foot sheets that
are 1/4", 3/8" and 5/8" thick. It replaced plaster and lathing in this
country many years ago because it was a lot easier and quicker to install.

Hope this helps.

Regards,

Ty Ford

Ty Ford's equipment reviews and V/O files can be found at
http://www.jagunet.com/~tford
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Postby archive » Sun Apr 11, 2004 4:37 am

From: "Jose Ramon San Juan" <sanjuanjr@x????xxx.xxx
Date: Mon Nov 29, 1999 2:31 pm
Subject: RE: Plywood

> I saw the above post and thought I could help. A "Dry Wall" is usually an
> exterior construction. A wall made without mortar (wet). Drywall is a a
man
> made material, probably gypsum, that comes in 4 foot by 8 foot sheets that
> are 1/4", 3/8" and 5/8" thick. It replaced plaster and lathing in this
> country many years ago because it was a lot easier and quicker to install.
>
> Hope this helps.

Thank you, Ty:

It seems clear that the gypsum board has become a synonime of dry wall in
America, but is every gypsum board good as acoustic absorber or only the
specially made for that?

Jose Ramon
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Postby archive » Sun Apr 11, 2004 4:37 am

From: "Ty Ford" <tford@x????xxx.xxxx
Date: Thu Jan 1, 1970 4:59 am
Subject: RE: Plywood

>
>Thank you, Ty:
>
>It seems clear that the gypsum board has become a synonime of dry wall in
>America, but is every gypsum board good as acoustic absorber or only the
>specially made for that?
>
>Jose Ramon
>

Jose,

Many people here believe that combinations of wall board produce better
results. The idea being that each piece has its own resonant frequencies and
that combining different pieces in a sandwich creates a more complex
obstacle to the sound, therefore blocking more frequencies more effectively.

One friend made sandwiches of drywall with a layer of Acoustilead (a thin
sheet of pliable lead) inbetween the sheets of drywall. He believes the
added density of the lead improved the sound blocking capabilities.

I've heard of people using 3/8" drywall, plywood and MDF (Medium density
fiber board, I think) to create one layered wall. Of course the isolation
from the structure is every bit as important. Thick walls by themselves will
not stop sound unless they are properly isolated from the surrounding
structure, and from each other.

Regards,

Ty Ford

Ty Ford's equipment reviews and V/O files can be found at
http://www.jagunet.com/~tford
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Postby archive » Sun Apr 11, 2004 4:37 am

From: "Jose Ramon San Juan" <sanjuanjr@x????xxx.xxx
Date: Wed Dec 1, 1999 12:09 am
Subject: RE: Plywood

Thanks again, Ty, but i am more interested in absorption than in sound
blocking and by the moment I am terrified for the prices of the specialised
companies.

Jose Ramon
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